Monday, December 20, 2010

Christmas, Magic, and Health

We may have reached that sad time in my daughter’s life when she stops believing in Santa Claus. Last Christmas she put us on notice that my handwriting on her presents was suspiciously similar to Santa’s. Her passage away from magic may have been accelerated by Miley Cyrus and her bong. Still, as a father, I will try to keep her from throwing the baby out with the bath water: she and all of us do well to keep some magic in our lives. I am convinced it is best to live our feet firmly planted on the ground and with our head in the clouds. After all, “where there is no vision the people perish.”


Aristotle said that poetry and fiction are more truthful and reliable than science and facts. I feel he meant that so-called science is always influenced by subjective beliefs and the money of those who pay for it. Then, “objectivity” is unquestioned and vital emotional issues and beliefs of those preaching those facts are ignored, whereas fiction and poetry take full account of those subjective forces, without apologizing or hiding their impact. Besides, fiction/poetry is flexible and amenable to change as we grow and learn. A good poem may address reality more eloquently and clearly than a complicated essay by a stuffy, egocentric and over-intellectualized professor.


None of these ramblings mean that we ought to get rid of science and objectivity. I am only talking about a balance between both of them. Einstein seemed to agree. He is often quoted saying that in order to solve today’s problems, we need to stop thinking in the same worn out ways that have led us into the very problems we struggle with. Considering Arthur C. Clark’s statement in the same breath adds more credibility to these far-out statements; he famously wrote that what we may not understand and call magic today is tomorrow’s science.


Of course, the “balance” point is going to be different depending on the person. I have tried to balance the feminine magic or “lunacy” with the masculine logic and the intellect by alternating my reading between fiction and non-fiction. I love literature; it has inspired me and modulated my scientific reading into a blend that I am comfortable with, a whimsical balance that often allows me to see facts in a new and fresh light. This perspective may be lacking in over intellectualized people who dismiss novels, and, yes, magic. The fact that half of the graduates from the Georgia Institute of Technology are musicians comes to mind.


Right now I am reading FALL OF GIANTS by Ken Follet, a spellbinding fictionalized story about WWI. Tell me, how many of us will sit to read a factual account of that terrible war that shaped our modern world? Before that I read OBAMA’S WAR: I had to force myself to read such a micro-managed view of that issue. Such reductionism leaves me cold; I feel it also alienates most readers who might be remotely interested. Of course, eggheads loved the book…


So, accompanied by my favorite date, my 10-year old Cosette (named after LES MISERABLES’ Jean Valjean’s daughter,) I have watched Harry Potter, NARNIA, and TRON in 3-D, the latter on the planetarium’s gigantic screen. Hopefully, Cosette will retain a love of magic and “that which cannot be explained.” Therein lies most of reality, as the movie THE MATRIX proposes. Interestingly, many physicists feel there is enough evidence to support the view that we, that is, our minds and our imagination create the reality we have in front of us. This is the “observer effect,” taken to the next level in the book THE UNIVERSE SOLVED[1] and many others.


So, when you run across magic and/or the works of angels, genies, druids, astrologists, alchemists, fairies, gnomes, visionaries, etc, don’t be too quick to dismiss them. Rather, enjoy the possibility that our reality is only an illusion, a trick we play on ourselves as we struggle as spirits in a materialistic world, a world we designed to improve ourselves and our ability to care, unconditionally, for one another. Therein we find health, peace and what matters most. Merry Christmas!




[1] Book Jim Elvidge; Alternative Theories Press, 2007

2 Comments:

At January 17, 2011 at 12:04:00 PM PST , Blogger jnpope said...

OK, Doc:

First of all, Santa is mythology cloaked in LIES that the parents feed to their kids. Is that really healthy? Why not be up front and tell the kids, "This is a FAIRY tale and fairy tales are not true, but rather they are make-believe: don't get too wound up in them."

In the second place, we need to question the lies we feed the kids so they can learn to discern the difference between fact and fiction. You are a doctor, and you know that if you feed your patients too much myth, they are going to leave you for a more truthful doctor.

In fact, you may already know that Allopathic medicine has failed. My grandfather was a doctor (an MD) who practiced in NYC and Atlanta, GA. The medicine he practiced would be known today as Naturopathy.

As he said in 1946, "I am ashamed of my profession. Doctors today are only interested in their specialties and they don't care about their Patients anymore." Several years later, it was announced that doctors had moved away from "cure" to "Disease Management". I remember thinking at the time, "I would rather be cured than have my disease "managed" for the rest of my life. I know, that is not what was intended, but isn't that more of what actually happened?

In fact, my late wife was an ND - Naturopathic Doctor. Her practice was an updated form of what my grandfather practiced. In fact, the healing that my wife practiced and taught was based upon natural healing thus the N in ND. I might also add that she left her former profession (British equivalent to a Nurse Practitioner) because she was "disgusted" with Allopathic medicine.

We can learn more from what our God inspired to be written into the Bible than we could learn from a lifetime of studying what the liars in medical "science" try to teach us. Certainly we do learn some good and useful things from medical science, but at what a cost? It is estimated that doctors cause the deaths of 225,000 people a year and that the poisons they push as medicine kill another 100,000 when used as recommended!

I haven't heard of NDs causing the death of patients, except possibly some who graduated from Bastyr University, and that primarily due to pharmaceutical prescriptions which they are allowed to prescribe without having had sufficient training to understand such medicines. (OK, I'm biased. My wife didn't go to Bastyr and this was one of her reasons that she studied elsewhere.)

Disclaimer: The above is my opinion based on my experience - I am not interested in debating. Nor do I expect anyone to change their opinions based on mine, but rather everyone should do their own research and discern fact from fiction, and then draw their own conclusions.

 
At January 17, 2011 at 12:14:00 PM PST , Blogger jnpope said...

Hi Doc,

You may already know that Allopathic medicine has failed. My grandfather was a doctor (an MD) who practiced in NYC and Atlanta, GA. The medicine he practiced would be known today as Naturopathy.

As he said in 1946, "I am ashamed of my profession. Doctors today are only interested in their specialties and they don't care about their Patients anymore." Several years later, it was announced that doctors had moved away from "cure" to "Disease Management". I remember thinking at the time, "I would rather be cured than have my disease "managed" for the rest of my life. I know, that is not what was intended, but isn't that more of what actually happened?

In fact, my late wife was an ND - Naturopathic Doctor. Her practice was an updated form of what my grandfather practiced. In fact, the healing that my wife practiced and taught was based upon natural healing thus the N in ND. I might also add that she left her former profession (British equivalent to a Nurse Practitioner) because she was "disgusted" with Allopathic medicine.

We can learn more from what our God inspired to be written into the Bible than we could learn from a lifetime of studying what the liars in medical "science" try to teach us. Certainly we do learn some good and useful things from medical science, but at what a cost? It is estimated that doctors cause the deaths of 225,000 people a year and that the poisons they push as medicine kill another 100,000 when used as recommended!

I haven't heard of NDs causing the death of patients, except possibly some who graduated from Bastyr University, and that primarily due to pharmaceutical prescriptions which they are allowed to prescribe without having had sufficient training to understand such medicines. (OK, I'm biased. My wife didn't go to Bastyr and this was one of her reasons that she studied elsewhere.)

Disclaimer: The above is my opinion based on my experience - I am not interested in debating. Nor do I expect anyone to change their opinions based on mine, but rather everyone should do their own research and discern fact from fiction, and then draw their own conclusions.

 

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